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Coupled Pitch-Lag Hinge for High Inertia Electric Rotors

Jean-Paul Reddinger, CCDC Army Research Laboratory

October 10, 2020

https://doi.org/10.4050/F-0076-2020-16327

Abstract:
As rotor diameter and inertia increases, the quickness of the thrust response to pilot inputs slows, yielding negative implications to handling qualities and limitations on scaling electric propulsion. This study presents a novel approach to alleviating these scaling effects by introducing a pitch-lag coupled hinge to the root of 40” and 50” diameter props. The impacts of chordwise hinge placement and hinge angle are examined and compared to a baseline rigid rotor to provide physical understanding of the rotor dynamics. It is shown that a coupled hinge can be designed to maintain propeller efficiency for a design thrust, while increasing the sensitivity of thrust to rotor speed and the maximum thrust of an RPM-limited rotor. Finally, the dynamic implications of this are tested using a first-order motor model. When a 40” diameter trimmed rotor is set to max throttle, rotors with a coupled hinge angle achieve a 6% higher thrust in 9% less time. The dynamic response improvement scales favorably when the rotor diameter is increased. For the 50” diameter rotor, the introduction of pitch-lag coupling reduces the time constant of the rotor’s thrust response by 32%.


Coupled Pitch-Lag Hinge for High Inertia Electric Rotors

  • Presented at Forum 76
  • 11 pages
  • SKU # : F-0076-2020-16327
  • Your Price : $30.00
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Coupled Pitch-Lag Hinge for High Inertia Electric Rotors

Authors / Details: Jean-Paul Reddinger, CCDC Army Research Laboratory